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Library Loot

June 22, 2011

House of Leaves – “Johnny Truant, wild and troubled sometime employee in an L.A. tattoo parlour, finds a notebook kept by Zampanò, a reclusive old man found dead in a cluttered apartment. Herein is the heavily annotated story of the Navidson Record.”

Scapegoat: Why We are Failing Disabled People – “Every few months there’s a shocking news story about the sustained, and often fatal, abuse of a disabled person. It’s easy to write off such cases as bullying that got out of hand, terrible criminal anomalies or regrettable failures of the care system, but in fact they point to a more uncomfortable and fundamental truth about how our society treats its most unequal citizens. In Scapegoat, Katharine Quarmby looks behind the headlines to trace the history of disability and our discomfort with disabled people, from Greek and Roman culture through the Industrial Revolution and the origins of Britain’s asylum system to the eugenics movement and the Holocaust, the recent introduction of Ugly LawsA” in the US and the grim effects of Britain’s hapless community careA” initiative. Quarmby also charts the modern disability rights movement from the veterans of WW2 and Vietnam to those still fighting for independent living, the end of segregation, and equal rights. Combining fascinating examples from history with tenacious investigation and powerful first person interviews, Scapegoat will change the way we think about disability – and how we treat disabled people.”

Olive Kitteridge – “Olive Kitteridge might be described by some as a battle axe or as brilliantly pushy, by others as the kindest person they had ever met. Olive herself has always been certain that she is 100% correct about everything – although, lately, her certitude has been shaken. This indomitable character appears at the centre of these narratives that comprise Olive Kitteridge.

Stoner – The son of a Midwestern farmer, William Stoner comes to the University of Missouri in 1910 to study agriculture. He had intended to return home and take over his father’s farm – but instead, inspired by the professor of English literature, he remains at the university to teach. Stoner tells of love and conflict, passion and responsibility against the backdrop of academic life in the early 20th century.

The Vet’s Daughter – “The daughter of a bullying veterinary surgeon, Alice Rowlands lives in the oppressive world of Edwardian south London. In her own vivid uneducated words, she here relates the story of her girlhood and the growth of her fatal occult powers.”

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6 Comments leave one →
  1. June 22, 2011 3:22 pm

    Scapegoat looks great. I’ll be interested to hear what you think. Olive Kitteridge is on my tbr list. Enjoy!

  2. June 22, 2011 10:30 pm

    What a great variety of books. The Vet’s Daughter sounds something I’d like – will have to check that one out. Happy reading!

  3. June 23, 2011 2:55 pm

    Oh, how lovely to see two NYRB titles here! I’ve heard such wonderful things about The Vet’s Daughter but unfortunately my library doesn’t carry it. Stoner also sounds excellent.

    Enjoy your loot!

  4. June 23, 2011 3:10 pm

    Linda & Cat – thanks!

    Claire – I spent about 45 mins looking at all the NYRB titles…suffice to say I now have an even longer tbr list!

  5. June 24, 2011 5:36 am

    Looks like a good collection. Haven’t read any of the books, but heard really good things about Olive Kitteridge and have had it on my to-read list for eons. Enjoy!

  6. June 26, 2011 5:57 pm

    House of Leaves is one of my favorite horror books. Hope you love it as much as I did.

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